NUTRIAD Sponsor of South Asia Layer Feed Quality Conference

Sep 18, 2017

Multinational feed additives producer Nutriad continues to support tradeshows, conferences and seminars across Asia. Most recently the Belgium headquartered company sponsored the 2017 South Asia Layer Feed Quality in Bangkok (Thailand). The event, that took place in September, addressed the specific challenges egg producers in India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan & Sri Lanka face centered around the theme of ‘Science, trials & application”. Leading regional and international speakers addressed a variety of topics that were well received by the attendees.   Dr. Glenn Alfred Ferriol, Nutriad Area Manager, presented a paper on “Butyrate: linking precision delivery with gut health, laying performance and egg shell quality” sharing the most recent updates on the application of ADIMIX PRECISION® in layers and how it addresses food safety (Salmonella and Campylobacter control).   Nutriad Regional Director BK Chew said: “The Layer Feed Quality Conference proved to be a good venue for Nutriad to once more show its commitment to the South Asian market. This year we added more manpower in the Indian sub-continent allowing us... ...

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BEVA welcomes new president

Sep 18, 2017

VDS claims consultant inaugurated at congress    During his term as president Dr Pycock hopes to celebrate the positives of working as an equine veterinary professional.   Jonathan Pycock of the Veterinary Defence Society (VDS) has been appointed as president of the British Equine Veterinary Association (BEVA). Equine claims consultant Dr Pycock will take up his role at the end of BEVA Congress (13-16 September), taking over from Vicki Nicholls. Renate Weller will become president elect. A graduate of the Royal Veterinary College (RVC), Dr Pycock has been heavily involved in the BEVA’s clinical practice and ethics and welfare committees since joining the council for the second time in 2014. During his term as president he hopes to celebrate the positives of working as an equine veterinary professional. He hopes to help members to achieve work/life balance, encouraging active participation in the association, as well as developing relationships between the BEVA and other equine organisations worldwide. He also wants to highlight the shortfall in research on equine reproduction and promote interest in this... ...

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How are antimicrobials used in food-producing animals?

Sep 18, 2017

Study combines literature review and stakeholder opinion on the subject   Concerns over antimicrobial resistance in both human and veterinary medicine   Bristol Veterinary School academics have found that, although there are some barriers to change, there is a clear awareness of the issue among the livestock sectors and a willingness to modify antimicrobial (AM) use. Food-producing animals throughout the world are likely to receive AMs, when needed, to treat infections. There are concerns, however, that their use in human and veterinary medicine is causing antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in both humans and animals. The Rapid Evidence Assessment (REA), led by Professor Henry Buller at the University of Exeter and Dr Kristen Reyher at the University of Bristol, investigated what is currently known about the use of AMs in food-producing animals, the practices and views of the stakeholders involved in the administration of AMs, and the availability and validity of data on AM use in practice. Forty-eight papers – published in peer-reviewed journals between 2000 and 2016 – were identified and reviewed. Key drivers... ...

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Study highlights similarities between human and animal food allergies

Sep 18, 2017

  Best diagnosis relies on elimination diet.                                   .    Symptoms of food intolerance are similar in both animals and humans, according to a new European position paper. Published in the journal Allergy, the research was summarised by researchers at the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna. The paper highlights the strong similarities in human and animal allergy symptoms and triggers of adverse food reactions. Moreover, it stresses the need for more comparative studies on the mechanisms and diagnosis of food intolerance. “Not only humans but basically all mammals are susceptible to developing allergies, as their immune system is capable of producing immunoglobulin E,” said lead author and nutrition scientist Isabella Pali-Schöll. While these special antibodies aid in the defence of parasites or viruses, they are also responsible for type 1 allergy symptoms, such as hay fever, allergic asthma and anaphylactic shock. In the paper, researchers show that symptoms of food... ...

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Advanced Animal teams with Zoetis to bring mastitis test to Europe

Sep 11, 2017

  The infectious bovine disease mastitis is a scourge on dairy farms, costing an estimated $2 billion in the U.S. and more than $1 billion in Europe in lost milk production and reproductive problems every year. Advanced Animal Diagnostics (AAD) of North Carolina has developed a diagnostic test to help dairy farmers make better use of antibiotics to control mastitis–and now it has a big-name partner to help introduce the product in Europe. AAD announced that it has partnered with Zoetis ($ZTS) to market QScout MLD, its diagnostic test that enables early detection of mastitis before symptoms become visible. Unlike more traditional tests for mastitis, which detect live pathogens, QScout can find white blood cells in milk–a sure-fire signal that the immune system is responding to the infection–according to AAD. The test runs on what AAD dubs its “lab-in-a-box” platform, which is portable, allowing farmers to easily cart it around and make point-of-care treatment decisions. “We believe we can save dairies and the veterinarians who serve them money by improving... ...

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Survival high in dogs with bloat, research shows

Sep 11, 2017

  A study has “blown the myth” gastric bloat is generally a death sentence for dogs affected by the condition across the UK. Gastric dilation-volvulus (GDV, or bloat) is an acute, life-threatening condition and because it often presents as an extreme emergency, many practitioners assume the prognosis will be grim. However, an epidemiological study from the Veterinary Companion Animal Surveillance System (VetCompass) at the RVC revealed 80% of dogs that underwent gastric bloat surgery survived, therefore shedding new light on the frequency, risk factors and survival of GDV. The study was based on a population of 77,088 dogs attending 50 Vets Now clinics across the UK. Overall, 492 dogs had GDV, giving a prevalence of 0.64% among the emergency caseload. Of the cases presented alive, approximately half of owners chose to pursue surgical treatment and, of these, 79.3% survived to discharge. “This study has blown the myth GDV is almost always a death sentence for affected dogs,” said VetCompass researcher Dan O’Neill. “Four out of five dogs operated on at primary emergency... ...

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Raising awareness of veterinary careers

Sep 11, 2017

  The stand was transformed into a ‘make-believe’ veterinary practice   College attends BBC Countryfile Live at Blenheim Palace Staff from the RCVS talked to members of the public attending the event about veterinary careers, the Find a Vet search tool, the Practice Standards Scheme, and roles within a veterinary practice. The stand was transformed into a ‘make-believe’ veterinary practice with activities for both children and adults, including a number of surgical models for prospective young veterinary surgeons to ‘operate’ on and a model dog on which future veterinary nurses could practice their bandaging skills. There was also a game – ‘Who’s who in your vet practice?’ – to help explain to show-goers the different roles within a typical veterinary practice team, including animal care assistants, veterinary nurses, advanced practitioners and RCVS specialists. Over the four days, College staff, along with RCVS and VN Council members – including RCVS president, Stephen May, handed out about 1,500 canvas bags to the public, all of which included information about the Find a... ...

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Combined technique provides hope for spina bifida puppies

Sep 11, 2017

Dr Beverly Sturges with Spanky, the English bulldog, following his successful spina bifida surgery   Puppies with spina bifida treated with combination of surgery and stem cells Placental stem cells were developed by researchers at UC Davis School of Medicine, then characterised and combined with a tissue-engineered scaffolding to optimise treatment by UC Davis veterinary surgeons. Dogs born with spina bifida frequently have little control of their hindquarters and are typically euthanised as puppies. This latest research offers hope for similar cases in the future, as well as a basis to inform human clinical trials for babies with the birth defect. The surgical techniques, developed by Dr Diana Farmer, professor and chief of surgery at the UC Davis, combined with the stem cell treatment developed by the research faculty, are progressions toward her goal of curing spina bifida. She has already pioneered the use of surgery prior to birth to improve brain development in children with spina bifida; and that prenatal surgery – combined with placenta-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (PMSCs),... ...

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Leading scientists call for unified approach to plant and animal breeding

Sep 4, 2017

Unifying the approaches to plant and animal breeding through the use of genomic selection is crucial to achieving global food security, according to a team of world leading scientists. In a paper published this week in the international journal Nature Genetics, scientists assert that global collaboration and investment across the two disciplines is central to increasing agricultural productivity and resilience. Exploiting scientific critical mass and the high volume of available genomic data about plant and animal species that is now available would help to address questions that are common to both disciplines. This would lead to “game changing” advances in breeding while simultaneously creating a platform for new scientific discoveries and “products” – such as plants that can grow with less water or lower levels of nutrients – that may be of particular benefit to the developing world. Professor Wayne Powell, Principal and Chief Executive of SRUC, co-authored the paper with Professor Ian Mackay, Head of Quantitative Genetics at NIAB, Tinashe Chiurugwi, former NIAB Research Scientist and Professor John Hickey, Chair... ...

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NUTRIAD MANAGER RECEIVES AQUA AWARD IN ASIA

Sep 4, 2017

The World Aquaculture Society (WAS), founded in 1969, is considered the world’s largest aquaculture society with currently more than 3,000 members in about 100 countries. It seems fair to say it is a good representation of the global aquaculture community. To meet address the local industries better, the WAS has created Chapters in the United States, Japan, Korea, Latin American and Caribbean region and the Asian-Pacific region called (WAS-APC).   A member since 2002, Allen (Ming-Hsun) Wu, Regional Manager Aquaculture APAC of Nutriad was elected as Board Director of World Aquaculture Society – Asian Pacific Chapter (WAS-APC) for 2015-2017. He served as a member of Industry relationship committee of WAS since 2012 and as member of the Asia-Pacific Aquaculture 2013 steering committee. He presented at the World Aquaculture editions of 2004, 2005, 2007, 2008 and 2009) and at the Asian- Pacific Aquaculture editions every year since 2007-2017. He judged the student presentation at World Aquaculture Adelaide 2014 and chaired a session at World Aquaculture 2015. Mr. Wu furthermore contributed to... ...

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