Dogs boost sales: 5 reasons dogs should go to work

Jan 22, 2018

How do you manage the stress levels and motivation of your employees? Maybe you buy your team a lavish lunch, or let them leave work 30 minutes early. But have you thought about the effect of bringing your beloved waggy-tailed dog into the office? Allowing dogs into the workplace – an appropriate workplace, of course, with no hazards or staff with a phobia of dogs – is proven to reduce stress and boost morale. Here, three companies that champion such an approach, as well as an expert on canine wellbeing, offer five good reasons why this can work for the company, the staff, and the dog! Dogs reduce sick days  Studies by the Kennel Club found that 90 percent of employers who allowed dogs in the workplace have “noticed a positive change in the working environment”. Additionally, the studies found that half of all businesses noted a “decrease in absenteeism”, as well as 56 percent stating that allowing dogs into the workplace has improved work relations. John Burns, veterinary surgeon... ...

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BVA and BVPA respond to new bird flu prevention zone announcement

Jan 22, 2018

  The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) has declared a bird flu prevention zone across the whole of England, requiring all bird keepers to follow strict biosecurity measures. The decision comes after 13 dead wild birds were confirmed to have the virus in Warwickshire. Last week 17 wild birds were tested positive in Dorset and 31 infected birds have now been identified at the Dorset site. At that time Defra responded by putting a local prevention zone in place and, now it is known the disease is not isolated to the Dorset site, the prevention zone has been extended across the country as a precautionary measure. The prevention zone means bird keepers across the country must: Make areas where birds are kept unattractive to wild birds, for example by netting ponds and by removing wild bird food sources; Feed and water birds in enclosed areas; Minimise movement in and out of bird enclosures; Clean and disinfect footwear and keep areas where birds live clean and tidy; Reduce any existing contamination by... ...

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Researchers aiming to define factors influencing cat ageing

Jan 22, 2018

The Cat Prospective Ageing and Welfare Study, being conducted at the University of Liverpool, is aiming to find answers on how to improve an ageing animal’s overall health and welfare. Alex German, Nathalie Dowgray and Kelly Eyre are trying to define “good ageing” in cats.   What is believed to be the largest study of its kind is being undertaken to define the ageing process in cats, and the factors that influence feline health and ageing. The Cat Prospective Ageing and Welfare Study, being conducted at the Feline Healthy Ageing Clinic at the University of Liverpool Small Animal Practice, will follow a cohort of around 300 cats over a period of four to five years. Cats aged between 7 and 15 are being recruited through the university’s practice to take part. ‘Largest of its kind’ The team is directed by Alex German, while cat vet and PhD student Nathalie Dowgray is leading the project, supported by RVN Kelly Eyre. Miss Dowgray said: “To our knowledge, with its longitudinal ageing study... ...

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Hare coursing gangs ‘will stop at nothing’, police say

Jan 22, 2018

Witnesses asked to report information to police   Cambridgeshire Police are urging the public to be vigilant for hare coursers, with one sergeant saying gangs ‘will stop at nothing’ to carry out their pursuits. In an online blog, Sergeant Andy Street said hare coursing gangs often come from various parts of the country. As well as the obvious animal cruelty issues, they frequently ‘drive across fields of newly set crops, causing thousands of pounds worth of damage and threatening anyone that challenges them,’ he explained. Using dogs to chase hares for sport is illegal under the Hunting Act 2004 and the Game Act 1831, yet it is one of the local issues that police received most calls about during autumn and winter. Sergeant Street said he has even ‘known of cases where the coursers have driven straight through the farmyard to get onto a field and when asked not to do so have responded with threats of violence, some have even threatened to burn down the farmer’s home.’ Cambridgeshire Police set... ...

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Research aims to shape future of canine health

Jan 22, 2018

      Claire Mitchell is aiming to create a dog skull classification system based on shape.   Six-year project targets creation of a bespoke classification system to help vets better assess disease prevalence, and tailor health and welfare advice to individual animals. The creation of the world’s first dog skull classification system could see vets assess health and welfare needs based on face shape alone. Animal welfare and management lecturer Claire Mitchell is measuring hundreds of dogs’ skulls to find out more about the correlation between head shape and health. It is anticipated the system will consist of at least five categories, including brachycephalic and dolichocephalic breeds, and consider skull and rostrum height. Such categorisation could help clinicians identify dogs that may be more prone to certain diseases. Tailored treatment Miss Mitchell, who is undertaking the study as part of her PhD at the University of Northampton, said: “Clearer, more logical categories that fit better with individual dogs will help tailor veterinary treatment and public information to particular categories,... ...

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BVA launches seven principles to help inform choice of farm assurance schemes

Jan 22, 2018

 To assist members of the veterinary profession and public to better understand farm assurance schemes on the basis of animal health and welfare, the British Veterinary Association (BVA) has developed a farm assurance schemes policy position setting out seven guiding principles. Farm assurance schemes enable customers to make sustainable and ethically informed choices about the food they buy, and allow producers to demonstrate their food products have met independently certified standards at each stage of the supply chain from farm to fork.   The breadth of UK farm assurance schemes is testament to the UK’s leadership in animal health and welfare standards. However, this variety could create a confusing customer experience when food shoppers are navigating both ethical and budgetary considerations as well as the shopping aisles.   BVA’s policy position has been developed as part of BVA’s Animal Welfare Strategy and sets out that the veterinary profession has a key role to play in helping inform the public about the animal health and welfare credentials of animal derived food. Based on the... ...

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Global Ingredient Leader Acquires Canadian Company

Jan 17, 2018

Kemin Industries has announced the creation of a Canadian division and will hold a grand opening and ribbon cutting ceremony this Thursday, January 18, 2018, at its new location in Mont-Saint-Hilaire, Quebec, Canada. Kemin has acquired the assets of its long-time distributor Agri-Marketing Corp. Agri-Marketing was founded in 1973 in Mont-Saint-Hilaire and has provided exclusive distribution and manufacturing services for Kemin products in Canada. “With this new location in Canada, we are increasing our efforts to better serve our current customers as well as explore new opportunities for our product and services to improve the quality of life for people and animals in Canada,” said Dr. Chris Nelson, President and CEO of Kemin. “Kemin continues to grow, and having a larger presence in Canada is a logical next step for our global expansion.” Agri-Marketing has been distributing Kemin products since its inception more than 35 years ago. Kemin expects a seamless transition for customers as Agri-Marketing sales employees become Kemin employees. The new Kemin location will focus on serving the... ...

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Wearable device identifies early signs of lameness

Jan 15, 2018

Vets at the University of Nottingham are developing a new, wearable device that can identify the early signs of lameness in sheep. Until now, farmers have struggled to diagnose lameness early because there are no validated commercial tools available. But now a new device, developed in partnership with Intel and Farm Wizard, aims to change this. The device consists of a sensing device worn on a sheep’s ear tag that gathers accelerometer and gyroscope data, effectively tracking the animal’s behaviour movement and gait. Nottingham Vet School researcher Dr Jasmeet Kaler explains: “Our new system is a smart device – a wearable technology that we hope will be a game-changing investment for sheep farmers and a first for the industry. “The algorithms we have developed are used to create different alerts for farmers. So far they have provided high accuracy in predicting various behaviours of the sheep, including differentiating lameness.” Dr Kaler’s previous research found that just 20 per cent of farmers can spot and treat the early signs of lameness... ...

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New draft code for meat chickens

Jan 15, 2018

An updated draft code of practice for meat chickens and meat breeding chickens has been published by Defra. The code follows a consultation carried out last year and was presented to Parliament on Tuesday (9 January). If there are no objections, it will come into force in March 2018. BVA president John Fishwick said: “We welcome the Government’s recognition of the vital role the veterinary profession plays in poultry welfare, with further references throughout the updated draft code to the importance of seeking veterinary advice.” The current code exists to give owners and breeders of meat chickens guidance on how to comply with relevant welfare legislation. However, it has not been updated since 2002. Defra says that the new code aims to provide up-to-date guidance on the current legislation, maintain animal welfare standards and reflect the latest scientific and veterinary knowledge. John Fishwick continued: “We are particularly pleased to see the recommendation that welfare outcomes should be used to assess and monitor the ongoing welfare of the birds as part... ...

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New anti-emetic product launched

Jan 15, 2018

Dechra Veterinary Products has launched a new formulation anti-emetic injection, Prevomax, for the treatment and prevention of vomiting and nausea in dogs and cats. The manufacturer said it contains benzyl alcohol, a preservative that is known to reduce pain at the injection site, compared to the alternative maropitant injection that is preserved by metacresol. The convenient 20ml bottle has a 56-day broached shelf life, making it ideal, said the firm, for use in a busy practice across multiple patients, reducing wastage. Dechra brand manager Claire Morgan said: “Human clinical studies have shown that an injection containing benzyl alcohol causes less pain than an injection preserved with metacresol. “Prevomax is particularly useful for the treatment and prevention of nausea induced by chemotherapy and for treatment of vomiting, in combination with other supportive measures.” Dechra is inviting veterinary professionals to share their experience of using Prevomax for a chance to win a £100 Amazon gift card. Entries should be submitted via the Dechra website by 28 February. ...

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