Animal Health: Delivering Solutions to Achieve a One Health World

Dec 21, 2017

Effective prevention and control of infectious diseases at the animal-human-ecosystem interface is essential. It will help combat the spread of diseases in animals and humans, ensure a safe and secure food supply, and foster a more sustainable society. The One Health approach prioritises quality of life for humans and animals, and recognises that healthy animals mean healthy people and a healthier planet. But what does this mean in practice and what steps need to be taken by the different sectors involved in order to realise the One Health vision? Roxane Feller at AnimalhealthEurope reveals all for the readers. ...

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Helping Animal Health Companies Succeed

Dec 21, 2017

Serving both companion and production animals, Canada’s animal health sector has developed an enviable reputation. Martin Yuill at PEI BioAlliance Inc reveals the key strengths of the Canadian sector, which include abundant resources, particularly water, to support food animal production; good infrastructure, including trans-portation networks; a stable and predictable regulatory regime; strong patent protection laws for new discovery; and a highly competent veterinary profession. ...

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Giving Your Herd the Best Chance for Successful Fertility

Dec 21, 2017

Achieving high levels of reproductive performance will be a major key performance indicator on most dairy farms this winter. David Wilde at Anpario considers some nutritional factors which could have an impact on success. Mr Wilde also advises paying close attention to dietary protein levels, commenting that it is well documented that feeding excess amounts of soluble protein can reduce conception rates. ...

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Statens veterinärmedicinska anstalt (SVA): Tularaemia Bacteria can be Found in Hare Meat

Dec 11, 2017

Tularaemia can infect and be transmitted between a large number of animal species, including humans. For the first time Gete Hestvik shows, in a dissertation from the National Veterinary Institute (SVA) and Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), that the causative bacteria, Francisella tularensis, in Sweden also can be found in the muscle of hares and that antibodies against the bacterium can be detected in brown bear, red fox, wild boar and wolverine. Tularaemia is one of the most common zoonotic diseases diagnosed in humans in Sweden, and it is also present in most European countries. Differences in surveillance and reporting of the disease, together with different ecosystems, the variation of arthropod vectors (e.g. ticks and mosquitos), small rodent species and other wildlife species make direct comparisons across all of Europe difficult. “A complex disease” – Tularaemia is a complex disease that involves a large number of animal hosts, as well as ticks and mosquitos and the surrounding environment, says PhD-candidate Gete Hestvik. Mountain hares and several small rodent species develop... ...

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